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Author Topic: Another day in the Pilbara  (Read 2040 times)

Offline Dave MacIntosh

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Another day in the Pilbara
« on: November 15, 2012, 11:56:43 PM »
Yesterday I went out to an outback aboriginal community with a local government health care group to give an insight into the types of snakes they might encounter and refresh the kids on the appropriate precautions, snake bite treatment etc, The health care worker missed the turn off and first as he was relatively new to his job and had only been out there on one prior occasion.
I was certain I could have found it anyway as it was the dirt track with a continuous trail of empty emu bitter beer cans.
Anyway after a little snooze we arrived at the community school but there was no one to be found, it was like a ghost town and the temperature was ridiculously hot. After about 20 minutes we finally tracked down the local principle and she decided that lunch break should be over (the kids were all at their private homes) and brought out this bloody loud siren that you could have heard 7 kms away. It had almost the same sound as a police siren.
Ever so slowly the various kids emerged from their hides and reluctantly made their way back to the school. The ironic thing about this is that most of these kids in a few years time word learn to flee from such a sound. Anyhow the reaction of me bringing live snakes into a class room didn’t exactly make any of them too comfortable and they certainly didn’t at first have the excitement that I see in the faces of many mixed race schools. The talk and demonstration went quite well and it was amazing to see so many aboriginals really enjoying hands on interaction with snakes they normally viewed of as food. It was also interesting to hear the individual names of the various retiles in their own language, even after hearing these names for years I still struggle to say it like they can.
After I had finished and was outside trying to palm off the overly persistent, a giant sized spiny-tailed monitor appeared and casually made it merry way past. The over hyped kids went into hunter or perhaps torment mode and chased it into a hole underneath the building. Out came the sticks and several minutes of poking and prodding the school principle appeared and started angrily growling at them all and explaining  to them that they should never hunt baby goanna’s and that she had seen its mother around which was about 1 and a half metres long. It wasn’t for me to get involved in a traditional hunting rights debate nor did I feel any point in letting the principle know that what they were trying to catch, torment (not sure) was in fact very much a fully grown specimen of a species she had no real idea about. I simply just quietly chuckled, that was until one little prick came running up to my smoko bag grabbed my packet of biscuits and tried to sprint away. My son Ryan who was  with me had amazing reflexes  and somehow snatched back the biscuits at lightning speed but unfortunately said words involving colour and a females anatomy which although was a natural unconscious  vocal reflex, was not appropriate considering where we were,
An interesting group of children to work with and an amusing day in the Pilbara,

Offline Bloomers

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Re: Another day in the Pilbara
« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2012, 06:48:16 AM »
Cheers for the story.

It is good to see local communities involved in education that even more privelged schools in the country never will.

One day i will have to get out that way.
"Truth is, everybody is gonna hurt u, u just gotta find the ones worth suffering for

Offline gusss

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Re: Another day in the Pilbara
« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2012, 12:24:03 PM »
Thanks for sharing Dave, very little to nil politcal correctness and honest, the way it should be. Also good to hear community involvment

Offline Dave MacIntosh

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Re: Another day in the Pilbara
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2012, 02:40:13 PM »
It was interesting to make comparisons between the outback indigenous kids and the white town kid folk. If one didn't know better you would expect that children from these communities would have more of an affinity with such wildlife yet it seems almost the other way around, at least in regards to being first up scared of them. At the end of the session however they seemed far more comfortable and enjoyed the handling experience. I have to wonder whether experiences like this will influence to any degree any sympathy for such creatures when they capture them for food next time.

Offline Dave MacIntosh

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Re: Another day in the Pilbara
« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2012, 04:50:17 PM »
A snake they were familar with except mine wasn't a Pilbara Olive.

Offline Dave MacIntosh

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Re: Another day in the Pilbara
« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2012, 04:53:08 PM »
Wake up  Ryan , we are here.

Offline Dave MacIntosh

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Re: Another day in the Pilbara
« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2012, 04:57:59 PM »
The siren round up.

 

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