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Author Topic: photography tips  (Read 4881 times)

steve1

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #15 on: November 28, 2010, 10:49:34 AM »
That's my understanding too.

Offline urodacus_au

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #16 on: November 28, 2010, 11:18:06 AM »
When shooting on manual with flash i leave the ISO at 100 for small animals (geckos, small skinks, Pygopods, small dragons). As the animal gets larger (snakes over 3 foot, medium sized monitors etc) i still want a small aperture for decent DOF so i up the ISO to 200 or 400 depending on how far away i am from the animal (and how well the flash is illuminating the subject at that distance). Ive shot at up to ISO 800 in natural low light conditions with little noise issues but havent gone any higher than that.

As an example we were photographing a Dugite around 4 foot long the other day. To get enough light on the animal shooting at 1/250th, f22 i upped my ISO to 200. It gave a better effect and reduced the light drop off that you often get with flashes at the top end of their capabilities. Others could shoot at lower shutter speeds (i have really shakey hands) and possibly remove the need for the ISO adjustment but its what i need to keep my images relatively sharp.

Jordan

Offline Bluetongue

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #17 on: November 28, 2010, 02:03:17 PM »
Steve,

The “(f-stop)” was referring to the word “aperture” just before it, that’s all. 

ISO and ASA are the two scales they used to use for ranking the light sensitivity of film.  Just like the two scales you have for temperature – Fahrenheit and Celsius. ASA was most commonly used here but with digital technology ISO has won out.

If you wanted to take photos of fast moving objects, such as race cars or flying insects etc you would use a film that was extremely sensitive to light, say ISO 800/30o compared to say film for everyday use which could be ISO 100/21o.  The down side was that photographs produced with highly light sensitive film are grainier and there is a limit how much you can enlarge them before the grain begins to show.

Instead of an emulsion on a celluloid strip, digital cameras have an array of light sensitive pixels forming a screen.  You can make it so the camera registers light separately on each pixel.  Or you can make it so light registers on a 2 by 2 array of pixels.  Or a 3 x 3 array.  Or a 4 x 4 array.  And so on.  As you imagine, a 4 x 4 array has 16 times the area of a single pixel and therefore 16 times the light sensitivity.  However, it reduces the ultimate detail to 1/16. This is a crude simplification but hopefully illustrates the point.

Given that most DSLR’s have 10 or more megapixels these days, you have a fair bit of leeway with the ISO settings before your enlargements will show up grainy.  So by increasing the ISO you can cut back on the aperture and increase your depth of field, even if you don’t have a flash. 

steve1

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #18 on: November 28, 2010, 02:54:29 PM »
Thanks for the explanation of ISO. I understand that Fstop and aperture are the same I was just trying to point out  for people like myself that a higher Fstop number eg f22 is a smaller aperture than say F8, I may be a slow learner, LOL, but many  times when I first got my camera I lowered the Fstop number in the belief I was decreasing the size of the aperture and by the time I realized my mistake the critter had scampered. It was difficult to get my head around the idea of bigger is smaller when I was just learning the very basics of my camera.

You don't post many pics for someone with such a vast knowledge of photography, I think you should start posting,LOL.

Offline eipper

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #19 on: November 28, 2010, 07:28:17 PM »
couple of tips

Do not cool down reptiles for photography...its not required....patience is!

Try to keep the animal in more or less the same plane (more of the animal will be within the dof zone) and produce a better shot

Use your flash as the rule rather than the exception

F11 to F32 are better than F 2.8 and F5

Know what you photographing....don't put a Death Adder in a tree or a Netted Dragon on moss...it might look nice but it will tend to look silly

when expirementing with setting before a shoot....use a coin or a lighter....they don't run away and gives you chance to get your settings more or less right before getting the shot

that will do for now

Cheers,
Scott

Offline Snowman

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #20 on: November 28, 2010, 09:40:35 PM »
I like shooting under f11.  It's not for ID or anything important, it just for fun and I like the look of it.
This is at f5.6


Offline Bluetongue

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #21 on: November 29, 2010, 02:51:54 AM »
Steve,

My camera gear is all film stuff.  A couple of bodies (Minolta & a Pracktika), 80 – 200 mm zoom, macro zoom and 35 mm fixed focus lenses, high hotshoe flash, aluminium bracket for wired side flash, tripod with telescopic legs and a X2 adaptor ring and a few other bits and pieces.  Weighs a ton and cost me a small fortune a lot of years ago.

I wouldn’t say I was great photographer but it used to be a hobby of mine.  Back then it was mainly focused on people, objects and landscapes.  Hadn’t really gotten back into reptiles at that stage, so they were just part of the wildlife.  Birds were the hardest things to get decent shots of.

I also got into developing and printing.  Black and white to begin with then graduated to colour prints using the Cibachrome system.  So I could take a 35 mm slide and make an A4 colour print of it.

I lost most of my recent photos and slides in one of the last of our many house moves.  And given we moved 6 times in 5 years at one stage, you don’t even get to open some cartons for over a decade.  By the time you realise something is missing, it’s too late to do anything.

A few years back the main camera body and telephoto lens hit the bitumen up above Lake Argyle and jammed solid – don’t wear thongs when chasing herp photos.  It was just a camping trip with a mate and his family but when I saw a decent herp a rush of blood got the better of me.

It remember it would make me laugh when relatives would remind me I had forgotten to turn the flash off when taking photos in the sunlight  Then when they got the results, they’d often say, Uncle Mike you take the best photos. 

And then I saw what my kids took with a simple point and shoot digital several years back.  I knew it wouldn’t be long before digital took over, so I never bothered to get the camera fixed.

So that’s how I know a bit about photography but don’t post pics.

Cheers
Mike

Offline Bluetongue

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #22 on: November 29, 2010, 03:13:54 AM »
Jordan,
Just read your comment re: camera shake.  For slow shutter speeds I used to use the tripod and a cable release.  Works a treat but you do need to set it up.

Jordan and Scott,
Great tips!  I hope people take note on how get good depth of field.

Snowman,
Nice effect - reducing the depth of field to blurr the background.

Mike
« Last Edit: November 29, 2010, 03:49:10 AM by bluetongue »

steve1

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #23 on: February 04, 2011, 11:01:02 PM »
I use photo bucket to upload on this site because I don't know how to resize ETC and the forum only allows  180 KB, most of my pics are way larger than this.
I have damaged a few good threads on this site by deleting and or shuffling pics around on Photobucket leaving them empty or wrongly titled. Is there anyway I can change this.

Steve

Offline Snowman

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #24 on: February 04, 2011, 11:08:17 PM »

steve1

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #25 on: February 04, 2011, 11:32:41 PM »
Thanks Snowman problem is I install it then it won't open

Offline Snowman

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #26 on: February 05, 2011, 07:54:04 AM »
You shouldn't have to open it. Once installed it should automatically resize any picture you try to post. Give it a go...
If you do want to open it though, click on the open envolope in the bottom right corner.

steve1

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #27 on: February 05, 2011, 08:58:54 AM »
I'll give it a go

Offline Snowman

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #28 on: February 05, 2011, 08:59:16 AM »
 ;D

steve1

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #29 on: February 05, 2011, 09:00:12 AM »
Cheers

 

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