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Author Topic: photography tips  (Read 4882 times)

Offline viridis

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photography tips
« on: October 03, 2010, 09:10:13 AM »
To all the very good photographers that are posting some very excellent photos.

                                              When you post the pics up.

How about posting the things that you do, and have done, to get those good pic's. You could post the technical info on this thread, with a reff to the particular thread photo.

Like how far you are away from the subject?  ETC

What flash, and  how many, how far away, above?   ETC

What F settings?  ETC

Do you cool the critters down?  ETC

Which camera did you use to take the pic? ETC

Any information that you can pass on to us novice pic takers, to help us take better pics would be very much appreciated buy all.----v

And to Bluetongue or Dave,  is it possible to have a category box, dedicated to photography tips like they have on some other sites.
« Last Edit: October 10, 2010, 07:29:40 AM by viridis »
( You will never fail ------ if you never quit )

Offline herpingmad

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #1 on: October 09, 2010, 06:22:38 PM »
What happened to the tips?.................Everyone has gone quiet, must be too busy herping :-)

Offline Rich

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2010, 01:35:53 AM »
Sounds like too busy getting pulled by DEC to me....

Offline viridis

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2010, 05:58:56 PM »
bump

To all the very good photographers that are posting some very excellent photos.

                                              When you post the pics up.

How about posting the things that you do, and have done, to get those good pic's. You could post the technical info on this thread, with a reff to the particular thread photo.

Like how far you are away from the subject?  ETC

What flash, and  how many, how far away, above?   ETC

What F settings?  ETC

Do you cool the critters down?  ETC

Which camera did you use to take the pic? ETC

Any information that you can pass on to us novice pic takers, to help us take better pics would be very much appreciated buy all.----v

And to Bluetongue or Dave,  is it possible to have a category box, dedicated to photography tips like they have on some other sites.
( You will never fail ------ if you never quit )

Offline viridis

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #4 on: November 27, 2010, 09:34:10 AM »
May as well start, taken with a Canon powershot sx10is not a real flash camera 20 times zoom,  still learning , macro,and opened  with paint re-sized  to  pixels 1000 to post. see what you think, first pic could be sharper.
( You will never fail ------ if you never quit )

Offline Snowman

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #5 on: November 27, 2010, 10:05:49 AM »
Looks Good V, Perhaps a little washed out though. You could try shooting in a mode where you can set the colour to vivid.

Taken with a nikon D80
F-stop: f/8
Exposure time: 1/160
ISO speed: ISO-640
Focal Legth: 105mm
Flash: No Fash
Exposure Program: Sutter Priority
White Balance: Auto
« Last Edit: November 27, 2010, 10:17:21 AM by snowman »

Offline Snowman

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2010, 10:10:59 AM »
Taken with a nikon D80
F-stop: f/8
Exposure time: 1/125
ISO speed: ISO-180
Focal Legth: 105mm
Flash: No Fash
Exposure Program: Manual
White Balance: Auto

Offline viridis

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2010, 10:19:04 AM »
Thanks for the tip I will try that next time, can't remember what it was on when I took that one .--v
( You will never fail ------ if you never quit )

Offline Snowman

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #8 on: November 27, 2010, 10:23:44 AM »
you can right click the mouse on the photo file and a menu will appear (in explorer). Click on properties, then select details and you will get all the info of how the pic was taken.

Offline viridis

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #9 on: November 27, 2010, 10:30:25 AM »
Well i'll be --, looks like I did that on zoom, well I never.---v
( You will never fail ------ if you never quit )

Offline Snowman

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #10 on: November 27, 2010, 10:31:25 AM »
Yep that's my handy tip for the day ;)

Offline viridis

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #11 on: November 27, 2010, 10:38:55 AM »
That is why I have been trying to get the " photography tips " thread going, to help us people who have little idea about taking good pic's, and don't have  SLR's, to take better shots.---v
« Last Edit: November 28, 2010, 10:32:34 AM by viridis »
( You will never fail ------ if you never quit )

Offline Bluetongue

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #12 on: November 27, 2010, 08:37:32 PM »
Viridis,

I can't help you with the all the fancy digital stuff where you let the camera do the choosing – I’ll leave that to Snowman.  But I can help with manual SLR techniques.

For example, both photos are over-exposed.  You have too much light.  The easiest way to overcome this is to reduce the aperture (F-stop).  If you feel the image lacks detail when enlarged, then could change the ISO setting to make it more detailed, which will also reduce the washout effect.

In the first image, your focus is on the eye which is the way to go.  The depth of field is not bad but fades a little down the neck.  A reduction in aperture is going to give you an increase in depth of field and with that, you would have an excellent shot, other than composition.  Either include both nostrils, or exclude one entirely for a classier shot. 

To get an idea of what the shot could have looked like, put it up on the computer screen and then angle the screen away from you until the image darkens.

With image 2 your focus is on the front of the mouth.  In combination with the depth of field, there is loss of focus at the back of the head and down the neck.  A good rule of thumb is to use the eye as your focussing point.  Also, the orientation of the subject will have an influence.  Again, for close-ups you usually want to maximise depth of field.  So a reduction in aperture size would help.  Love the composition of this pic.

I don’t know whether that helps or confuses.

Regards,
Mike

steve1

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #13 on: November 28, 2010, 10:29:49 AM »
To reduce the aperture size the F number has to be increased not decreased.

Unless an animal is flighty and I'm desperate to get a shot I virtually always shoot in manual mode. The more you shoot in manual the more you will learn about your camera and the faster you will become at making adjustments in the field with the subject in front of you. It is very frustrating to check an image and then whilst making adjustments the animal decides to take flight.
I usually use the flash rather than natural light as it's easier to get good depth of field, and seems to produce sharper images and less shadowing. If your in direct sunlight asking your mate to cast a shadow over the subject can help when using the flash.
If using natural light choosing a higher Fstop number and using slower shutter speeds can can give enough exposure while maintaining depth of field, however the slower the shutter speed the more susceptible to shakes.
I don't understand ISO very well but I do know that a lot of people choose to leave it at 200 most of the time in most conditions.
When you have an animal that's happy to stay there and pose use the opportunity to experiment with your camera.

If you are not that interested in learning the basics of photography and just want nice pictures DON'T by a DSLR

Offline Snowman

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Re: photography tips
« Reply #14 on: November 28, 2010, 10:46:33 AM »
I've got no idea when it comes to photography. But my understanding of ISO is that the higher the number the less light needed. So you could shoot inside at 1600 without a flash. The trade off for this is 'noise'. Higher iso has more grain in low light situations.

It appears that nearly everyone these days has gone dslr. I think even on auto settings they produce a better picture than a point and shoot. But by sticking to auto settings they aren't utilising the cameras full potential. (though a beginner like me fumbling around with manual settings isn't getting full potential either)
« Last Edit: November 28, 2010, 10:57:06 AM by snowman »

 

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